Einstein & The Jealous Monk

Huddersfield Art Gallery

Princess Alexandra Walk, Huddersfield, W. Yorks HD1 2SU

Permanent Collection

Chris Gollon was a friend of The Skids and enjoyed the company of musicians, often using great song lyrics as a starting point for ideas that led him to new imagery. Purchased by the Museum for its permanent collection in 2005, Chris Gollon’s ‘Einstein & The Jealous Monk’ , 60″ x 48″, 153 x 122cm, acrylic on canvas 2004, which takes partial inspiration from lines in Bob Dylan’s great ballad ‘Desolation Row’. This major work is displayed in the collection alongside works by Francis Bacon, Sir Jacob Epstein, John Bellany, Henry Moore, Walter Sickert and L.S. Lowry.

Museum open: Tues – Weds 11-4pm, Thurs 11-7pm, Fri – Sat 11-4pm. Closed: Sunday – Monday and Bank Holidays.

Gollon At Henley – A Celebration

Following his unexpected death, to celebrate Chris Gollon’s life and work, the award-winning River & Rowing Museum, Henley-on-Thames, has re-arranged its exhibition schedule to display his painting of the Henley Royal Regatta, which it commissioned in 2008 and is now part of the Museum’s permanent collection that includes works by Dufy, Piper and Trevelyan. They have also displayed an example from each of the the four editions of silk-screen studies Chris Gollon produced on his way to completing the main work. Since most people’s experience of the Henley Royal Regatta is losing (there are no silver or bronze medals), Chris Gollon chose to depict and focus upon the losing rowers. ‘Gollon At Henley’ (pictured right in the current display, 36″ x 48″, 91 x 122cm, acrylic on canvas 2008) was unveiled in 2008 to much acclaim, including this excellent review by Simon Barnes: The Times. To view all the painting studies and for further information, click: Gollon At Henley. IAP Fine Art, published the four editions of silk-screen studies, some of which are available and can be viewed here: Studies.  The River & Rowing Museum is open daily 10am – 5pm: Location & Times.

St Ethelflaeda (Diptych) for Romsey Abbey

ROMSEY ABBEY, Church Lane, ROMSEY, Hampshire. SO51 8EP & open Mon – Sat 07.30am – 6pm, Sun 11-6pm. Free entry.

As his national touring exhibition to cathedrals also travelled to Romsey Abbey in autumn 2016, Chris Gollon was taken both by the Abbey and the history of its famous Abbess, St Ethelflaeda. He painted as a site-specific work for two stone recesses this dramatic diptych of St Ethelflaeda, Abbess of Romsey at the time of the first millennium. Gollon’s diptych looks at the legend recounted of St Ethelflaeda, the moment her candle blows out and she is able to continue reading the Bible only by the light emanating from her hand. The diptych subtly gives the impression of St Ethelflaeda re-entering the Abbey, imbued with light. It  has now been purchased by Romsey Abbey, where it hangs permanently for the public and congregation to enjoy.

“Crossings: Art and Christianity Now”

Southwell Minster

Church Street, Southwell, Nottinghamshire. NG25 0HP

An Exhibition in Two Parts:

Crucifixion Now – Sat 10th Feb – Thurs 22nd March 2018

Resurrection Now – Sun 1st April (Easter Day) – Mon 14th May 2018

Following the success of ‘The Art of Mary’ exhibition in January 2016, which featured works by Chris Gollon, Celia Paul, Iain McKillop and Nicholas Mynheer among others, Fr Matthew Askey, curator at Southwell Minster is planning an even more ambitious project. Approx 40 leading contemporary artists have been invited to produce a new work for each part of this exciting exhibition. They include Chris Gollon, Tai Shan Shierenberg, Peter Howson, Biggs and Collings, Enzo Marra, Mark Cazalet, Nicholas Mynheer, Tom Ormond, Stuart Pearson-Wright and many others.

Fourteen Stations of the Cross

Chris Gollon’s fourteen paintings of the Stations of the Cross are permanently installed in the Church of St John on Bethnal Green, which is a beautiful grade-one listed church designed by Sir John Soane and located next to the Museum of Childhood. It is open to visitors Saturday 10-1pm, or during services. To read more about the story of this unusual major commission, click here.